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Narrative: Extreme Weather
Slide 10: Nighttime Lights + Solutions (image)
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Narrative: Extreme Weather
Slide 10: Nighttime Lights
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Slide 10: Nighttime Lights + Solutions (image)

Slide 10: Nighttime Lights + Solutions (image)

Say:

In some communities, energy companies are switching at least a third of the fossil fuels they use to cleaner energy sources such as solar arrays, wind turbines, and wave energy buoys. There are other choices we can make by supporting hybrid and clean fuel busses, mass-transit programs, green roof projects, and municipal solar panel. These are all ways of moving toward energy sources that don’t contribute to the heat-trapping blanket. 

We can all connect to others who care about climate change by following groups on Facebook and Twitter such as 350.org and the Union of Concerned Scientists. Or we can join a local rideshare group, bike-share programs, or other groups where we can keep learning, support one another, and be a part of the solution. 

Are there any groups in your area that you can join? Are there any online communities, or websites you like to follow?

Learning about your options, voicing your opinions, and promoting and voting for causes you believe in are all ways to make change happen. Discussing these ideas with your families, neighborhoods, and communities is a great start. What will you do today?

Notes and Rationale:

The focus on alternative energy as the “meta-Solution” is an important part of the Visualizing Change strategy for educating the public on the implications of climate science.

Encouraging visitors to keep learning, and to do so in a social way (online or in person) is also part of the strategy. Studies show that when people join groups, follow news feeds, or engage in social media on an issue, they are more likely to continue to build their knowledge base, share what they learn, and advocate for the issue.

In piloting these narratives, interpreters have observed that guests find it challenging to identify community-level solutions. They tend to say “solar and bike programs” since they were previously mentioned. What can we offer to support discussion?

It’s important to suggest local, community programs. Suggest municipal projects in your area and groups they can join specifically. Think about groups that are already in place for them to join. Ride shares, bike shares, or educational groups. Are there any other Facebook or Twitter news feeds? Source the crowd so they answer and share their ideas with one another as well. This gives a feeling of community.

Other community projects can be found on websites like greenenergyfutures.ca

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