previous
Narrative: Extreme Weather
Slide 09: Nighttime Lights Animated
next
previous
Narrative: Extreme Weather
Slide 09: Nighttime Lights
next

Say:

As the heat in our ocean and atmosphere increases, we can expect to see an increase in the number of strong hurricanes. While the total number of future events is uncertain, it is likely that those that do occur will be more intense. Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and Typhoon Haiyan in 2013 are examples of the types of intense storms that are likely to occur in the future.

The heart of our global system driving climate and weather has already been disrupted. Just like heart health can be improved by changes in behavior (like diet and exercise), the health of the planet’s heart can be improved by changes, too. Just like we monitor our hearts to keep them healthy and prevent them from damage, it’s important to monitor the oceans so that they can continue to move the right amount of heat and moisture through the climate system and prevent these storms from getting more intense.

Communities are coming together both locally and globally developing innovative solutions. We can help by reducing our reliance on fossil fuels, which will reduce the amount of heat trapping gases in our atmosphere.

Notes and Rationale:

This section uses precise wording about risk in order to accurately convey the scientific consensus on what we can project about the effect of climate change on extreme weather events. We don’t know that the number of hurricanes will increase, but we do know that warm water drives hurricanes. So, for those that do form, the warmer water means more intense storms like Haiyan and Katrina.

Returning to the metaphor Climate’s Heart here helps the narrative segue into the possibility of Solutions: interventions, changes, promising directions that can improve the situation.

IMAGE: This is a view of Earth at night, showing electricity usage and sometimes highlighting roads, fishing fleets, and city centers.

Table of Contents
Close