previous
Narrative: Ocean Acidification
Slide 07: Species Impacted by Ocean Acidification (series of images)
next
previous
Narrative: Ocean Acidification
Slide 07: Species Impacted ...
next
Species Impacted by Ocean Acidification

Species Impacted by Ocean Acidification

Say:

Many marine species that live in the Pacific Northwest are being affected by ocean acidification now. Studies of the native Olympia oyster showed that survival and growth decreased with exposure to OA in laboratory and field settings.

{Click 5X. Images fade in} The same appears to be true for other native species like pteropods (a type of swimming snail), red sea urchins, northern abalone, and turban snails. 

What do all of these animals have in common? {Pause, solicit response from audience if possible} They all have a hard shell.

Have you seen any of these animals in our tide pools (e.g. crabs, snails, mussels, sea urchins, etc.)? We have examples of some of those animals here at our Closer Look Table too. {offer shell biofacts, if using}

So, what does ocean acidification actually do to these animals?

Notes and Rationale:

This beat in the narrative specifies negative effects on marine life using a concrete local/regional example.

The species selected here have been the focus of recent peer-reviewed research (see NOAA/WHOI 20 Facts about Ocean Acidification, November 2013). When selecting species native to your region, seek out scientific research to support the evidence of impacts being observed. Avoid including speculative findings. 

Connecting the biological impacts of Ocean Acidification to the animals in our exhibits makes this largely unfamiliar issue more tangible and relatable to our visitors. 

Introduce biofacts and invite hands-on exploration as appropriate to the presentation setting.

Table of Contents
Close